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Thursday, January 18, 2018

Top 10 Tech Trend Predictions for 2018 from a Tech CEO
by  Heinan Landa


As we cross into 2018, what can we expect to see on the technology side of things? Here are my top 10 predictions (in countdown fashion). I recommend CEOs take a moment to discuss these trends with their CIOs/CTOs and evaluate which ones will provide the most value for your company and should be made a priority in 2018 and beyond.

10. TVs will get smarter and way, way cheaper. Ever heard of Element Electronics brand televisions? I hadn’t either until I found that their sets come equipped with Amazon’s Fire TV built right in. Same story with TCL TVs, which I only know about because they come with Roku streaming. These “off-brand” sets are gaining traction thanks to big-name technologies, while maintaining pricing that makes me seriously regret my (significantly more expensive) purchase a few years back.

9. Businesses will relent and embrace social software platforms. We’re nearing mainstream adoption for software tools like Slack and Microsoft Teams. These Facebook-esque platforms reduce email clutter, streamline communication and facilitate collaboration. We’re all sick of splintered, endless email chains, and these intuitive and user-friendly packages eliminate that hassle from our day-to-day. By year’s end, I think we’ll be hard-pressed to find many organizations that still rely exclusively on email.

8. They’ll get smart about using technology to attract and retain millennials, too. Beyond the social software platforms, businesses will focus in on technology solutions that allow for better collaboration, mobility and real-time communication. These are the capabilities that millennials expect, and are the same ones that will help unlock their maximum potential in the workplace. Some businesses will be ahead of the curve with this, and others will shift their approach once they realize they have a turnover issue on their hands.

7. We’ll see more high-powered tablets running around. I expect Microsoft’s Surface tablet and comparable models to continue gaining ground. As companies become more and more focused on creating a highly-effective mobile workforce, they’ll turn their attention toward these powerful devices that travel well and are less intrusive in a business meeting scenario. Some of the “clone” devices – the Lenovo Miix and Asus Transformer, for example – are at a very attractive price point, too.

6. Buyers will get shrewd about the cloud. We aren’t intimidated by “the cloud” anymore. In fact, businesses are getting quite savvy about it; they know that not all clouds and not all cloud providers are created equal, and they’re asking increasingly sophisticated questions when it comes to vetting their options. Providers in particular will find themselves exploring elements like security, risk mitigation, productivity and collaboration in much greater depth than they’ve been asked to before.

5. In response, cloud providers will step up their game. More sophisticated buyers means a more sophisticated product. We’ll see more and more cloud offerings that cater directly toward a specific industry, specific compliance regulations, and specific software packages. The closer providers can get to a specialized plug-and-play product, the better chance they’ll have to get a leg up over their competitors.

4. IT services will get worse. The IT industry is teeming with mergers and acquisitions. As demand climbs for one-stop-shop IT outsourcing, service firms are gobbling up MSPs, telecom providers, cloud providers, cybersecurity firms, strategic consulting firms and whatever else they can get their hands on. Unfortunately, I don’t expect these transactions to result in better service; as these new conglomerates experience massive expansion, they’ll become so focused on integration that, for awhile, they’ll lose sight of their purpose: serving their clients.

3. Voice technology will creep its way into our offices. Amazon has released Alexa for Business, which functions as a voice-controlled “intelligent assistant.” We’ll see some brave souls experiment with shouting orders at a speaker on their desk, and we’ll see the technology evolve as developers respond to the feedback these brave souls offer. Eventually, I think voice command will find a home in the corporate setting… but not to any substantial degree in 2018.

2. Yes, a $1,000 smartphone will be a success. Remember when Apple announced the iPhone X and everyone promptly lost their minds about it being so expensive? $999 is certainly pricey when it comes to smartphones, but it isn’t unreasonable; there’s a large market of folks out there who will shell out this kind of money, and they’re precisely the group that will appreciate the subtle but functional (and elegant) changes Apple has made to this model.

1. LinkedIn will explode. Since Microsoft took over, LinkedIn has gotten a fresh new interface, native video, live messaging, trending stories, and I’m sure more is on the way. We’re going to start seeing businesses flock to this network – which is 500 million users strong – and leveraging it as a powerful tool for both recruiting and business development.

Fuente: Chief Executive

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    .·. Miguel Ángel MEDINA CASABELLA, MSM, MBA, MHSA .·.
    Especialista Multicultural Global en Management Estratégico, Conducta Organizacional, Gestión del Cambio e Inversiones, graduado en University of California at Berkeley y The Wharton School (University of Pennsylvania)
    Consultor en Dirección General de Cultura y Educación de la Provincia de Buenos Aires
    Miembro del Comité EEUU del Consejo Argentino para las Relaciones Internacionales
    Representante de The George Washington University para LatAm desde 1996
    Ex Director Académico y Profesor de Gestión del Cambio del HSML Program para LatAm en 
    The George Washington University (Washington DC)
    CEO, MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS GROUP LatAm
    TE Oficina: ( 0054) 11 - 3532 - 0510
    TE Móvil (Local): ( 011 ) 15 - 4420 - 5103
    TE Móvil (Int´l): ( 0054) 911 - 4420 - 5103
    Skype: medinacasabella


    MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS GROUP LatAm ©
    (mamc.latam@gmail.com+5411.3532.0510)
    es una Consultora Interdisciplinaria cuya Misión es proveer
    soluciones integrales, eficientes y operativas en todas las áreas vinculadas a:

    Estrategias Multiculturales y Transculturales, Organizacionales y Competitivas,
    Management Estratégico,
    Gestión del Cambio,
    Marketing Estratégico,
    Inversiones,
    Gestión Educativa,
    Capacitación

    de Latino América (LatAm), para los Sectores:

    a) Industria y Servicios,
    b) Universidades y Centros de Capacitación,
    c) ONGs y Gobiernos.

    Thursday, January 11, 2018

    How Companies can prepare for the new Digital Reality
    by  Katie Kuehner-Hebert


    Organizations that pay attention to the principles for digital disruption will be best positioned for today’s complex digital reality, according Mathias Herzog, a partner at PwC’s Strategy&, and one of the authors of the strategy consulting group’s report, 10 Principles for Digital Disruption.

    “Over time, disruption impacts market share and profitability of incumbent business models, and there is a gradual impact we’ve seen with most disruptions,” Herzog said in an interview with Chief Executive. “In most industries, organizations that have passed that tipping point – as defined by market share and beginning to lose money – have migrated to a new business model.”

    These organizations have a heightened sense of urgency, whereas other organizations find themselves a little further from the tipping point, so they perhaps have more time, he says. As such, there’s a time sensitivity that varies based on the situation.

    In either case, PwC believes there are a number of things organizations should do in a structured manner to really understand the disruptive forces at play and how they might potentially impact them. Here are a summary of the 10 ideas.
    1. “We advise our clients to build their ‘organizational muscle’ around assessing the environment,” Herzog says. “One data point to follow is the venture capital flow into technologies – look into the funding that is going into new types of business models within a given sector. This can offer indications of how rapidly disruption is approaching.”
    2. Define your digital identity, looking freshly at the way you deliver value, in light of what digital technology can do for you.
    3. Begin building new capabilities early and proceed strategically, rather than frantically and reactively, he says. That way, these capabilities will be ready when their industry finally reaches its tipping point.
    4. Companies should also focus on their right to win, by building an identity grounded in their distinctive capabilities, and then aligning their value proposition around that.
    5. Constantly reimagine your customers’ needs in ways you may not know is possible, and in return, you will likely gain privileged access to those customers, he notes. If your audience responds to price reduction, for example, work to increase customer adoption with lower prices to scale up new business models and “make it difficult for rivals to compete.”
    6. Identify ways to create value from underused facilities, tech resources, staff time and information available for sharing across your enterprise.
    7. Use platforms, Herzog says, to break free of the constraints of your sector or even of your department, and go wherever the capabilities system provides an advantage. By relying on technology and capabilities provided by others, companies can carve out a differentiated niche on the vast business-to-business systems emerging now.
    8. Also, use your new business model to enable an enterprise-wide digital transformation, instead of experimenting on the side with “safe” but quarantined pilot efforts. “Companies should challenge the rules,” Herzog says, “orienting practices toward the intent rather than the letter of the law.”
    9. Foster a culture rooted in strategy, customer experience and technology – by evolving digital insight and business strategy along the journey.
    10. Use digital technology as a catalyst to change the way their business operates. They should assemble teams that integrate business strategy, customer experience and technological acumen.
    Herzog doesn’t believe organizations have a choice to ignore these principles. With past disruptions, as incumbent business models shift in value, market share and customer knowledge also shift – customers become more savvy and then have an expectation that business will disrupt.

    “At some point, the businesses that don’t move will find themselves in a situation beyond the tipping point, and then it becomes really hard,” he said. “They are then on the decline – on the defensive – and their ability to invest in things other than their old business model is going to get more limited.”

    “It will be a death spiral – that’s definitely something we’ve seen with past disruptions,” Herzog said.

    Source: Chief Executive

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    TALLERES DE CAPACITACIÓN IN COMPANY, "A MEDIDA" 
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      ó al TE: +5411.3532.0510


      .·. Miguel Ángel MEDINA CASABELLA, MSM, MBA, MHSA .·.
      Especialista Multicultural Global en Management Estratégico, Conducta Organizacional, Gestión del Cambio e Inversiones, graduado en University of California at Berkeley y The Wharton School (University of Pennsylvania)
      Consultor en Dirección General de Cultura y Educación de la Provincia de Buenos Aires
      Miembro del Comité EEUU del Consejo Argentino para las Relaciones Internacionales
      Representante de The George Washington University para LatAm desde 1996
      Ex Director Académico y Profesor de Gestión del Cambio del HSML Program para LatAm en 
      The George Washington University (Washington DC)
      CEO, MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS GROUP LatAm
      TE Oficina: ( 0054) 11 - 3532 - 0510
      TE Móvil (Local): ( 011 ) 15 - 4420 - 5103
      TE Móvil (Int´l): ( 0054) 911 - 4420 - 5103
      Skype: medinacasabella


      MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS GROUP LatAm ©
      (mamc.latam@gmail.com+5411.3532.0510)
      es una Consultora Interdisciplinaria cuya Misión es proveer
      soluciones integrales, eficientes y operativas en todas las áreas vinculadas a:

      Estrategias Multiculturales y Transculturales, Organizacionales y Competitivas,
      Management Estratégico,
      Gestión del Cambio,
      Marketing Estratégico,
      Inversiones,
      Gestión Educativa,
      Capacitación

      de Latino América (LatAm), para los Sectores:

      a) Industria y Servicios,
      b) Universidades y Centros de Capacitación,
      c) ONGs y Gobiernos.

      Thursday, January 4, 2018

      How can you identify the real Innovation Hub?


      Many cities and states are laying claim to the title Innovation Hub. But is there a way for those considering where to open or relocate a business to tell if a city or state is walking the walk?

      Innovation centers are the future, but to determine if it has truly taken root in a place, you must look to the recent past and ask: Have big investments been made to encourage innovative thinking among executives and students alike? Have public school initiatives and workforce-training programs equipped residents with STEAM skills?

      Rhode Island recently underwent a successful makeover into a true hub of innovation, an initiative that took many years. This small state has become a leader of the pack for other places that want to prioritize innovation—and not just by paying lip service to the concept.

      What Rhode Island has also done is the following:
      1. Invest: Rhode Island Governor Gina M. Raimondo’s innovation initiatives include investments in the form of tax credits, grants and workforce training programs and partnerships between schools and local companies. The Innovation Voucher Program offers companies with fewer than 500 employees the opportunity to apply for grants of up to $50,000 to fund an R&D project alongside a local university, research center or medical center. This program supports research that leads to commercialization for small and growing businesses.
      2. Support: Created the Innovate Rhode Island Small Business Fund in 2013 to support a variety of small business programming to foster job creation and enhance the workforce pipeline. The Fund encourages the establishment of high-growth ventures in Rhode Island.
      3. Collaborate: Twenty acres in Downtown Providence are being cultivated as the state’s new Innovation and Design District. Situated between academic and business partners, the District has a unifying vision of innovation and economic development.
      4. Educate: Under Gov. Raimondo, Rhode Island implemented strong statewide STEAM education and training, including CS4RI, the country’s most comprehensive computer science initiative. And the Wavemaker Fellowship is positioned to keep graduates in-state by defraying the cost of student debt for grads working in the STEM fields at Rhode Island employers.
      To tell if a place is innovative, look to the caliber of companies arriving there. General Electric will open its digital technology center in Providence. Trade Area Systems is leaving Massachusetts for Providence to recruit better talent. Extracts producer Finlays will open a research and manufacturing space in the state and General Dynamics Electric Boat plans to hire thousands of new employees at its Quonset Point shipyard.

      Rhode Island is now the fastest-growing advanced industries hub in New England. According to the 2016 Brookings Institution’s American’s Advanced Industries: New Trends report, it’s now in the top third in the nation for advanced industries job growth. From 2013 to 2015, the rate of growth in advanced industries jobs increased by 285 percent. In 2015, more than 40,000 full-time workers were employed in advanced industries, earning an average salary of $73,918.

      Fuente: Rhode Island Commerce Corporation

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      TALLERES DE CAPACITACIÓN IN COMPANY, "A MEDIDA" 
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        Consultas al email: mamc.latam@gmail.com
        ó al TE: +5411.3532.0510


        .·. Miguel Ángel MEDINA CASABELLA, MSM, MBA, MHSA .·.
        Especialista Multicultural Global en Management Estratégico, Conducta Organizacional, Gestión del Cambio e Inversiones, graduado en University of California at Berkeley y The Wharton School (University of Pennsylvania)
        Consultor en Dirección General de Cultura y Educación de la Provincia de Buenos Aires
        Miembro del Comité EEUU del Consejo Argentino para las Relaciones Internacionales
        Representante de The George Washington University para LatAm desde 1996
        Ex Director Académico y Profesor de Gestión del Cambio del HSML Program para LatAm en 
        The George Washington University (Washington DC)
        CEO, MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS GROUP LatAm
        TE Oficina: ( 0054) 11 - 3532 - 0510
        TE Móvil (Local): ( 011 ) 15 - 4420 - 5103
        TE Móvil (Int´l): ( 0054) 911 - 4420 - 5103
        Skype: medinacasabella


        MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS GROUP LatAm ©
        (mamc.latam@gmail.com+5411.3532.0510)
        es una Consultora Interdisciplinaria cuya Misión es proveer
        soluciones integrales, eficientes y operativas en todas las áreas vinculadas a:

        Estrategias Multiculturales y Transculturales, Organizacionales y Competitivas,
        Management Estratégico,
        Gestión del Cambio,
        Marketing Estratégico,
        Inversiones,
        Gestión Educativa,
        Capacitación

        de Latino América (LatAm), para los Sectores:

        a) Industria y Servicios,
        b) Universidades y Centros de Capacitación,
        c) ONGs y Gobiernos.

        Tuesday, December 12, 2017

        Leading Up, Down, and Sideways


        U.S. Army General George Patton famously said, “Lead me, follow me, or get out of my way.” The quote is often used to describe how aggressively assertive he was, conveniently ignoring the fact that Patton said — as a general — he was willing to follow. He implied that leadership involves flexibility, especially in a tumultuous environment such as war. At any one time, and depending on circumstances, there must be more than one person who is able and willing to take the lead.

        It’s an idea that resonates strongly in today’s business world, where disruptive innovations, unexpected competitors, and industry upheavals have become commonplace. Greg Shea, Senior Fellow, Wharton Center for Leadership and Change Management, says it’s the idea behind a new program, Becoming a Leader of Leaders: Pathways to Success.

         “Traditionally, the highest ranking person made the decisions and gave the orders. But today’s leaders can’t afford to have people reporting to them who are not leaders in their own right”, he says. “A turbulent, unpredictable world requires a kind of adaptability that can’t come just from the top — you need everyone to be proactive, scanning the environment, looking for opportunities and potential hurdles, and taking the initiative”.

        Shea says that while the idea of “leading down” is getting plenty of attention, there is little talk about how leaders can and should do it. “This is the real core of the Becoming a Leader of Leaders. What are the skills you need? How do you manage and take care of yourself so you can develop others? How can you become a more effective coach and mentor?”.

        Leading down is only part of the job. Successful managers must also learn to lead up and sideways...

        “If you’re not part of a team made up of a set of leaders reporting up, you are creating a vulnerability for yourself and your organization”, continues Shea. “Everyone should be actively involved. One CEO I worked with had an interesting approach. Every once in a while he would say to his team, ‘I am worried about ___ because no one else is worried about it.’ He expected a proactive set of folks who anticipate what needs to be done. He expected to be a leader of leaders”.

        But becoming more adept at leading down and developing others’ leadership is only part of the equation. Linked closely are leading sideways — working with your peers to develop key interdependencies and fight against vulnerabilities — and leading up — how you approach those who are more senior, and how you find a good mentor and become a good mentee, especially in the mid- and later stage of your career. “Your peers and superiors also expect you to be proactive”, says Shea. “You have to be prepared to lead in every direction”.

        Source: The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

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        TALLERES DE CAPACITACIÓN IN COMPANY, "A MEDIDA" 
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          Consultas al email: mamc.latam@gmail.com
          ó al TE: +5411.3532.0510


          .·. Miguel Ángel MEDINA CASABELLA, MSM, MBA, MHSA .·.
          Especialista Multicultural Global en Management Estratégico, Conducta Organizacional, Gestión del Cambio e Inversiones, graduado en University of California at Berkeley y The Wharton School (University of Pennsylvania)
          Consultor en Dirección General de Cultura y Educación de la Provincia de Buenos Aires
          Miembro del Comité EEUU del Consejo Argentino para las Relaciones Internacionales
          Representante de The George Washington University para LatAm desde 1996
          Ex Director Académico y Profesor de Gestión del Cambio del HSML Program para LatAm en 
          The George Washington University (Washington DC)
          CEO, MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS GROUP LatAm
          TE Oficina: ( 0054) 11 - 3532 - 0510
          TE Móvil (Local): ( 011 ) 15 - 4420 - 5103
          TE Móvil (Int´l): ( 0054) 911 - 4420 - 5103
          Skype: medinacasabella


          MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS GROUP LatAm ©
          (mamc.latam@gmail.com+5411.3532.0510)
          es una Consultora Interdisciplinaria cuya Misión es proveer
          soluciones integrales, eficientes y operativas en todas las áreas vinculadas a:

          Estrategias Multiculturales y Transculturales, Organizacionales y Competitivas,
          Management Estratégico,
          Gestión del Cambio,
          Marketing Estratégico,
          Inversiones,
          Gestión Educativa,
          Capacitación

          de Latino América (LatAm), para los Sectores:

          a) Industria y Servicios,
          b) Universidades y Centros de Capacitación,
          c) ONGs y Gobiernos.

          Friday, December 1, 2017

          5 Strategy Questions every Leader should make time for
          by Freek Vermeulen


          Have you ever noticed that when you ask someone in your company, “How are you?” they are more likely to answer “Busy!” than “Very well, thank you”? That is because the norm in most companies is that you are supposed to be very busy – or otherwise at least pretend to be – because otherwise you can’t be all that important. The answers “I am not up to much” and “I have some time on my hands, actually” are not going to do much for your internal status and career.

          However, that you are very busy all the time is actually a bit of problem when you are in charge of your company or unit’s strategy, and responsible for organizing it. Because it means that you don’t have much time to think and reflect. And thinking is in fact quite an important activity when it comes to assessing and developing a strategy.

          The CEO of a large, global bank once told me: “It is very easy for someone in my position to be very busy all the time. There is always another meeting you really have to attend, and you can fly somewhere else pretty much every other day. However, I feel that that is not what I am paid to do. It is my job to carefully think about our strategy.”

          I believe his view is spot-on. And there are other successful business leaders who understand the value of making time to think. Bill Gates, for example, was famous for taking a week off twice a year – spent in a secret waterfront cottage – just to think and reflect deeply about Microsoft and its future without any interruption. Similarly, Warren Buffett has said, “I insist on a lot of time being spent, almost every day, to just sit and think.”

          If you can’t find time to think, it probably means that you haven’t organized your firm, unit, or team very well, and you are busy putting out little fires all the time. It also means that you are at risk of leading your company astray.

          As famous management professor Henry Mintzberg has described, much of strategy is “emergent.” It is often not the result of a strategic plan just being implemented, but driven by opportunistic responses to unexpected events. Stuff happens. Companies often engage in new activities – customers, markets, products, and business models – serendipitously, in response to external events and lucky breaks. But this also means that business leaders need to make ample time to reflect on the configuration that has emerged. They need to systematically analyze and carefully think it through, and make adjustments where necessary.

          Many leaders don’t make that time – at least not enough of it.

          If you are in charge of an organization, force yourself to have regular and long stretches of uninterrupted time just to think things through. When you do so – and you should – here are five guiding questions that could help you reflect on the big picture.

          1. What does not fit?

          Ask yourself, of the various activities and businesses that you have moved into, do they make sense together? Individually, each of them may seem attractive, but can you explain why they would work well together; why the sum is greater than the parts?

          As the late Steve Jobs explained to Apple’s employees when he axed a seemingly attractive business line, “Although micro-cosmically it made sense, macro-cosmically it didn’t add up.” If you can’t explain how the sum is greater than the parts, re-assess its components.

          2. What would an outsider do?

          Firms often suffer from legacy products, projects, or beliefs. Things they do or deliberately have not done. Some of them can be the result of what in Organization Theory we call “escalation of commitment.” We have committed to something, and determinedly fought for it – and perhaps for all the right reasons – but now that things have changed and it no longer makes sense, we may still be inclined to persist. A good question to ask yourself is “what would other, external people do, if they found themselves in charge of this company?”

          Intel’s Andy Grove called it “the revolving door” when discussing strategy with then-CEO Gordon Moore; let’s pretend we are outsiders coming new to the job, ask ourselves what they would do, and then do it ourselves. It led Intel to withdraw from the business of memory chips, and focus on microprocessors. This resulted in more than a decade of 30 percent annual growth in revenue and 40 percent increase in net income.

          3. Is my organization consistent with my strategy?

          In 1990, Al West, the founder and CEO of SEI – the wealth management company that, at the time, was worth $195 million – found himself in a hospital bed for three months after a skiing accident. With not much more to do than stare at the ceiling and reflect on his company’s present and future, he realized that although they had declared innovation to be key in their strategy, the underlying organizational architecture was wholly unsuited for the job. When he went back to work, he slashed bureaucracy, implemented a team structure, and abandoned many company rules. The company started growing rapidly and is now worth about $8 billion.

          As a consequence of his involuntary thinking time, West did what all business leaders should do: he asked himself whether the way his company was set up was ideal for its strategic aspirations. What would your organization look like if you could design it from scratch?

          4. Do I understand why we do it this way?

          When I am getting to know a new firm, for instance because I am writing a case study on them, I make it a habit to not only find out how they do things but also explicitly ask why. Why do you do it this way? You’d be surprised how often I get the answer “that’s how we have always done it” [while shrugging shoulders] and “everybody in our industry does it this way.”

          The problem is that if you can’t even explain why your own company does it this way, I am quite unconvinced that it could not be done better. For example, when more than a decade ago I worked with a large British newspaper company, I asked why their papers were so big. Their answer was “all quality newspapers are big; customers would not want it any other way”. A few years later, a rival company – the Independent – halved the size of its newspaper, and saw a surge in circulation. Subsequently, many competitors followed, to similar effect. Yes, customers did want it. Later, I found out that the practice of large newspapers had begun in London, in 1712, because the English government started taxing newspapers by the number of pages they printed — the publishers responded by printing their stories on so-called broadsheets to minimize the number of sheets required.  This tax law was abolished in 1855 but newspapers just continued printing on the impractically large sheets of paper.

          Many practices and habits are like that; they once started for perfectly good reasons but then companies just continued doing it that way, even when circumstances changed. Take time to think it through, and ask yourself: Do I really understand why we (still) do it this way? If you can’t answer this question, I am pretty sure it can be done better.

          5. What might be the long-term consequences?

          The final question to ask yourself, when carefully reflecting on your company’s strategy and organization, is what could possibly be the long-term consequences of your key strategic actions. Often we judge things by their short-term results, since these are most salient, and if they look good, persist in our course of action. However, for many strategic actions, the long-term effects may be different.

          Consider a practice adopted by many of the UK’s IVF clinics – of selecting only relatively easy patients to treat, in order to boost short-term success rates (measured in terms of number of births resulting from the treatment). The practice seems to make commercial sense, because it (initially) makes a clinic look good in the industry’s “League Table.” But, as my research with Mihaela Stan from University College London showed, it backfires in the long run because it deprives an organization of valuable learning opportunities which in the long run leads to a lower relative success rate.

          When you start a new strategy or practice it is of course impossible to measure such long-term consequences ex-ante, however, you can think them through. For instance, when we asked various medical professionals in these clinics what might be the benefits of treating difficult patients, they could understand and articulate the learning effects very well. They could not measure them, but with some careful thought they could understand the potential long-term consequences before even engaging in the strategic action. Actions often have different effects in the short and long run. Sit down and think them through.

          Strategy, by definition, is about making complex decisions under uncertainty, with substantive, long-term consequences. Therefore, it requires substantial periods of careful, undisturbed reflection and consideration. Don’t just accept the situation and business constellation you have arrived at. Leadership is not just about doing things, it is also about thinking. Make time for it.

          Fuente: Harvard Business Review

          Haciendo click en cada uno de los links siguientes, Contenidos de nuestros 
          TALLERES DE CAPACITACIÓN IN COMPANY, "A MEDIDA" 
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            Consultas al email: mamc.latam@gmail.com
            ó al TE: +5411.3532.0510


            .·. Miguel Ángel MEDINA CASABELLA, MSM, MBA, MHSA .·.
            Especialista Multicultural Global en Management Estratégico, Conducta Organizacional, Gestión del Cambio e Inversiones, graduado en University of California at Berkeley y The Wharton School (University of Pennsylvania)
            Consultor en Dirección General de Cultura y Educación de la Provincia de Buenos Aires
            Miembro del Comité EEUU del Consejo Argentino para las Relaciones Internacionales
            Representante de The George Washington University para LatAm desde 1996
            Ex Director Académico y Profesor de Gestión del Cambio del HSML Program para LatAm en 
            The George Washington University (Washington DC)
            CEO, MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS GROUP LatAm
            TE Oficina: ( 0054) 11 - 3532 - 0510
            TE Móvil (Local): ( 011 ) 15 - 4420 - 5103
            TE Móvil (Int´l): ( 0054) 911 - 4420 - 5103
            Skype: medinacasabella


            MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS GROUP LatAm ©
            (mamc.latam@gmail.com+5411.3532.0510)
            es una Consultora Interdisciplinaria cuya Misión es proveer
            soluciones integrales, eficientes y operativas en todas las áreas vinculadas a:

            Estrategias Multiculturales y Transculturales, Organizacionales y Competitivas,
            Management Estratégico,
            Gestión del Cambio,
            Marketing Estratégico,
            Inversiones,
            Gestión Educativa,
            Capacitación

            de Latino América (LatAm), para los Sectores:

            a) Industria y Servicios,
            b) Universidades y Centros de Capacitación,
            c) ONGs y Gobiernos.